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Posts for: May, 2018

By The Brace Place Orthodontics
May 29, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: braces  

Understanding your orthodontic needs may turn into a complicated issue. That's why Dr. Josh Goldknopf can break it down for you and make the process a pleasant one for you and your loved ones, just drop by his Jacksonville Beach and Ponte Vedra, FL, office.Braces

Here's some information about orthodontics in the meantime:

More On Braces

Orthodontics is a specialized field of dentistry that helps people deal with jaw and teeth alignment. Braces are the oral appliances meant to fix these problems; they help repair the position and orientation of your teeth by applying pressure on the teeth that need to be adjusted.

Braces are usually used for children between the ages of seven and 14. They are good candidates because their face and jaws are still developing, which may make the treatment easier and more successful.

Adults, however, can still benefit from orthodontic treatment.

Reasons You May Need Braces

The reasons people need braces vary. Here are a few examples of some issues braces can help with:

  • Crooked, crowded and/or missing teeth
  • Poorly aligned jaws
  • A bad bite, also known as malocclusion

These issues can be caused by bad habits, like thumb-sucking, or a traumatic injury while playing a sport and some issues are simply hereditary.

Your Jacksonville Beach and Ponte Vedra orthodontist can examine and assess your dental health, as well as provide a custom plan that will give you what you need.

How to Care for Your Braces

You must maintain a healthy oral habit to ensure there isn't plaque buildup and cavity formation. Brush your teeth twice a day and floss once before bed, at the very least. This is so no food debris becomes entangled in your braces' brackets and wires.

If you're interested in learning more about orthodontic treatments and would like to contact Dr. Josh Goldknopf at his Jacksonville Beach and Ponte Vedra, FL, office, please call (904) 249-0037 today.


By The Brace Place Orthodontics
May 25, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: oral hygiene   braces   orthodontics  
DontForgetYourOralHygieneWhileWearingBraces

There are a few things you need to do — and not do — while wearing braces: avoid hard or sticky foods, for example, or wear protection during sports to avoid injury. There's one important thing, though, that should be at the top of your list — extra attention to daily brushing and flossing.

The fact is your risk for developing tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease increases during orthodontic treatment. This is because the braces make it more difficult to reach a number of locations around teeth with a toothbrush or floss. Bacterial plaque, the source for these dental diseases, can subsequently build up in these areas.

Teen-aged orthodontic patients are even more susceptible to dental disease than adults. Because their permanent teeth are relatively young they have less resistance to decay than adults with more mature teeth. Hormonal changes during puberty also contribute to greater gum disease vulnerability.

There are some things you can do while wearing braces to avoid these problems. Be sure you're eating a nutritious diet and avoid sugary snacks or acidic foods and beverages (especially sports or energy drinks).  This will deprive bacteria of one of their favorite food sources, and the minerals in healthy food will contribute to strong enamel.

More importantly, take your time and thoroughly brush and floss all tooth surfaces (above and below the braces wire). To help you do this more efficiently, consider using a specialized toothbrush designed to maneuver around the braces. You might also try a floss threader or a water irrigator to remove plaque between teeth. The latter device uses a pressurized water spray rather than floss to loosen and wash away plaque between teeth.

Even with these efforts, there's still a chance of infection. So, if you notice swollen, red or bleeding gums, or any other problems with your teeth, visit us as soon as possible for an examination. The sooner we detect and treat dental disease while you're wearing braces, the less the impact on your future smile.

If you would like more information on taking care of teeth while wearing braces, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Caring for Teeth During Orthodontic Treatment.”


By The Brace Place Orthodontics
May 17, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Invisalign  

Do you have questions about Invisalign from your Jacksonville Beach and Ponte Vedra, FL, orthodontist?Invisalign

Unlike traditional braces, Invisalign is discreet. Invisalign consists of plastic, clear aligners. If a patient has minor tooth imperfections, like slightly crooked teeth, small gaps, or improperly positioned teeth, Invisalign is a great option.

Traditional braces may be necessary if there are major cosmetic issues, like severe overbite, or major crowding.

Invisalign works by applying forces to each tooth to place them in their proper position. The clear, flexible plastic is custom-designed using a specialized software. It is convenient for adults and older teens.

The treatment may take about one year, depending on your dental needs, and consists of trays that fit your upper and bottom teeth. Trays should be worn for a minimum of 20 hours per day, and can be removed if you have an event, but that's unnecessary since they're invisible.

Invisalign include allows you to have more dietary choices. Simply biting into an apple can ruin traditional wires, but you don't need to worry about that when it comes to clear aligners. Aligners are comfortable because the thin, flexible material of Invisalign doesn't irritate soft tissues in the mouth, unlike metal wires of braces. There's definitely an improved oral hygiene since Invisalign is removable. This means you can brush and floss your teeth with ease, as well as clean out the trays. If you have a teeth-grinding problem, clear aligners can act as a nightguard.

In order to take proper care of your clear aligners, as mentioned above, you need to clean them out daily. Rinse them with lukewarm water and use a brush to remove food debris. Also, brush your teeth twice a day, at the very least, and floss once before bed.

Visit your Jacksonville Beach and Ponte Vedra orthodontist periodically during and after your treatment. You'll need to wear retainers given to you and have your teeth professionally cleaned to prevent plaque buildup and formation of cavities.

If you have any questions or need more information about Invisalign, call Jacksonville Beach and Ponte Vedra, FL, orthodontist, Dr. Josh Goldknopf, today!


By The Brace Place Orthodontics
May 15, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
DrawingImpactedTeethintotheOpencanRestoreaSmile

You don’t have to be a dental professional to appreciate a beautiful smile. Likewise, you’ll also know when something’s not quite right with one.

Such can be the case when a tooth fails to erupt properly, causing most or all of the crown to remain below the gum line, a condition known as impaction. Upper canines (or “eyeteeth,” for their location in the arch under the eyes) are especially susceptible to impaction: located on either side of the lateral incisors, which are on either side of the central incisors (the two center front teeth).

The upper canines are important both for function and appearance. Working with their lower counterparts they help cut through food as we chew, so you lose some of that efficiency when they don’t erupt properly. Impacted teeth are susceptible to abscesses and cysts, and can impinge upon and damage the roots of other teeth. And just as importantly, their absence also disrupts the smile as nearby teeth tend to move or “drift” toward the open space.

Rather than remove the impacted canines as is often done with back teeth, it may be more advantageous for both function and appearance to “coax” them into full eruption. This requires first pinpointing their exact location below the gums using x-rays or cone beam 3-D imaging.

If the teeth are in reasonably good position we must first prepare them for orthodontic treatment by surgically exposing the crown from the gums and bonding a small bracket to it. We then attach a small gold chain to the bracket that extends outside of the gums when we suture them back into place. The chain is attached to orthodontic hardware that exerts pressure on the impacted tooth for several months to “pull” it out into the arch.

This procedure has the best chance of success if undertaken before the end of jaw development in early adulthood. Otherwise, it may be better to remove the impacted canines and replace them with dental implants, followed by orthodontic treatment of other teeth to restore their proper position and bite relationships. In either case, your impacted upper canines don’t have to be a problem — we can restore both your mouth function and your smile.

If you would like more information on impacted teeth and treatment options, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Exposing Impacted Canines.”


By The Brace Place Orthodontics
May 05, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
3ThingsYouMightnotKnowAboutMovingTeeth

If you press your tongue against your teeth, unless something is badly wrong they won't budge. In fact, your teeth are subjected to a fair amount of pressure each day as you chew and eat, and yet they remain firmly in place.

But there's a deeper reality—your teeth do move! No, it's not a paradox—the gum and bone tissues that hold your teeth in place allow for slight, imperceptible changes in the teeth's position. Their natural ability to move is also the basis for orthodontics. Here are 3 more facts you may not know about your teeth's natural ability to move.

Teeth are always on the move. Teeth are held firmly within the jawbone by an elastic gum tissue called the periodontal ligament and a thin layer of bony-like material called cementum. In response to pressure changes, though, the bone dissolves on the side of the teeth in the direction of pressure and then rebuilds behind it, solidifying the teeth's new position, a process that happens quite slowly and incrementally. And it will happen for most of us—some studies indicate more than 70% of people will see significant changes in their bite as they age.

Orthodontics works with the process. Orthodontic appliances like braces or clear aligners apply targeted pressure in the direction the orthodontist intends the teeth to move—the natural movement process does the rest. In the case of braces, a thin metal wire is laced through brackets bonded to the front of the teeth and then anchored, typically to the back teeth. The orthodontist incrementally tightens the wire against its anchors over time, encouraging tooth movement in response to the pressure. Clear aligners are a series of removable trays worn in succession that gradually accomplish the same outcome.

Watch out for the rebound. That nice, straight smile you've gained through orthodontics might not stay that way. That's because the same mechanism for tooth movement could cause the teeth to move back to their former positions, especially right after treatment. To avoid this outcome, patients need to wear a retainer, an appliance that holds or "retains" the teeth in their new positions. Depending on their individual situations and age, patients may have to wear a retainer for a few months, years or from then on.

If you would like more information on orthodontic treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Importance of Orthodontic Retainers.”